What does the NFPA regulate?

What does the NFPA regulate?

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is an organization that is dedicated to the elimination of death, injury, property, and economic loss due to fire, electrical, and other related hazards. This organization was founded back in 1896, and today serves members around the world as a self-funded nonprofit organization. Their focus on fire and electrical hazards allows them to create very detailed standards that have proven to be effective in many situations.

NFPA For Emergency Responders

The NFPA is used primarily by emergency responders including firefighters, police officers, and others. These professionals need to know about potential fire risks that come from chemicals, environmental hazards, electrical systems, and much more. In addition to knowing about the threat from these types of things, emergency responders need to know how to best prevent fires and get them contained as quickly as possible. One of the biggest ways that the NFPA helps in this area is by offering standard labeling that will let responders know what type of hazards are in the area.

NFPA for the Workplace

In addition to emergency responders, the NFPA has standards that should be followed by companies. Workplace safety is an extremely important, and one of the biggest hazards is fire. By following the codes and standards developed by the NFPA a company is able to dramatically reduce fire risks. In addition, facilities that comply with NFPA standards are easier to protect for emergency responders, which can further improve safety.

Mandatory Regulations

The NFPA publishes regulations related to fire and electrical safety, but these regulations aren’t actually required by law in most cases. It is only when their recommended best practices are adopted by governmental authorities such as OSHA that a company or other agency must follow them. A growing number of the codes and standards from NFPA, however, are becoming law because they have become a proven way to improve workplace safety.

 

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NFPA Labeling Guide
 
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