Are NFPA labels required by OSHA?

The NFPA 704 code is the labeling system that was developed to identify hazardous materials that are often used in the workplace. It is primarily used by emergency responders, though it is also beneficial for any workplace that can benefit from the information. Given the fact that there are other labeling standards, such as GHS, many people aren’t sure which ones are required by OSHA and which ones aren’t.

NFPA in OSHA Standards

Some of the labeling standards developed by the NFPA have been incorporated into OSHA standards. In these cases, they are required to be followed. OSHA commonly takes the standards and guidelines established by other organizations and adds them to their own regulations. This is a proven way to make sure OSHA is always using the best standards when it comes to workplace safety. While OSHA has not adopted all of the codes and standards created by the NFPA, many of them are present in their requirements.

Additional NFPA Standards

While it is true that OSHA has implemented some of the NFPA codes into their standards, that is not the case for all of them. Most of the codes and guides written up by the NFPA are followed voluntarily by those who use them. Fire departments, police departments, and other emergency responders use these standards regularly in places throughout the country and around the world. This is because the concepts developed by the NFPA are proven effective and these organization want to do everything possible to keep people safe.

Additional Adoption of NFPA

While emergency responders are the primary users of the NFPA codes, they certainly aren’t the only ones. Many companies have adopted the labeling standards, safety standards, and other recommendations because they want to not only improve fire safety within their own facility, but also because it can make it easier for emergency responders to do their job when necessary. Of course, adopting NFPA voluntarily will help ensure that a company is compliant with those parts of it that have been made mandatory by OSHA.

 

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Additional Resources

NFPA Labeling Guide
 
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