What organization is involved with fire safety regulations?

What organization is involved with fire safety regulations?

The organization that is involved with fire safety regulations is the National Fire Protection Association (the NFPA). This group is an international non-profit organization that is devoted to helping eliminate fire and electrical hazards that most often result in death, property damage, and severe injury.

About the NFPA

Founded in 1896, the NFPA has published more than 300 consensus codes and standards that detail research, training, education, and outreach programs for those who are involved in situations that contain potential fire risks. These standards have been deemed to be sufficient in minimizing the possibility of accidents involving fires. All the information on NFPA fire safety regulations are available to the public for purchase on their online catalog. They offer seminars, professional certification programs, conferences, and develop all kinds of guides for firefighters, first responders, and others involved in safety and health issues.

NFPA standards have been adopted and used throughout the world in the time since this organization was founded. These codes are administered by over 250 technical committees that have over 8,000 volunteers and 50,000 members as of 2018. Revisions are made to these documents through a process that has been accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and incorporates the input of the public for those needed changes. People can become volunteers or members with this organization to receive the most updated information that benefits not only the person participating, but also the people they choose to interact with when considering these standards and regulations.

Creative Safety Supply has several articles and other resources that detail subjects that the NFPA is concerned about in regards to keeping the workplace safe and efficient. Like the NFPA, we are the most concerned about the safety of people in any kind of situation; fire hazards are not an exception.

 

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