What are other forms of visual communication to use alongside safety signs?

Visual communication goes much further than signs. Facilities using several types of visual communication around the workplace can ensure the point is made and people understand the hazard, notice, or safety instruction message. Visual communication is so crucial to safety as people are far more likely to notice and remember information they gather visually, rather than something they hear. Facility managers should ensure their strategies are explained in a training session. The following are examples of other forms of visual communication that should be used in conjunction with safety signs:

  • Floor tape: Industrial floor tape is a highly effective visual communication tool. Yellow tape is commonly used to create lanes for warehouse or pedestrian traffic, red floor tape can be used to mark off fire hazard areas, and photoluminscent tape (or glow-in-the-dark) tape is perfect for creating extremely visible evacuation routes. Floor tape even comes in patters. Hazard-striped tape is ideal when it comes to marking off large hazardous machines or equipment.
  • Floor marking shapes: Industrial floor shapes can include dots, corners, footprints, T’s, and arrows, made out of the same durable materials of industrial floor tape. Footprint shapes and arrows can create pathways, corners create staging areas,
  • Vinyl labels: These durable labels can often be in the same format as a common safety wall sign, but with the added bonus of being smaller and with an adhesive back. This allows the user to directly apply the label to equipment, machinery, or industrial vehicles. Industrial label printers gives the facility the option to create hundreds of custom, professional grade labels in just a day.
  • LOTO tags: Lockout/Tagout tags are a clear indicator whether or not a machine is energized, alerting the workers when it is safe to work on a machine. Utilizing red hazard stripe tapes for a proper LOTO procedure can save workers from severe injuries and death.
 

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Additional Resources

OSHA Label and Sign Color Chart
 
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